Download Aging in East and West: Families, States, and the Elderly by Dr. Vern L. Bengtson PhD, Kyong-Dong Kim PhD, George Myers PDF

By Dr. Vern L. Bengtson PhD, Kyong-Dong Kim PhD, George Myers PhD, Ki-Soo Eun PhD

Widely known specialists current the 1st comparative research of modern advancements between six jap and Western international locations referring to inhabitants getting older and its results. Chapters specialize in demographic traits, sociocultural contexts, and coverage implications. international locations chosen as case reviews contain: the People's Republic of China, the Republic of Korea, Japan, Germany, the uk, and the U.S.. The editors and individuals name awareness to the numerous trajectories and results of inhabitants getting older in culturally various societies which are frequently at diverse phases or on diverse paths of financial improvement. Such analyses carry into sharper concentration these stipulations which are detailed, or related, and emphasize the ways that cultural stereotypes of getting older and the aged complicate our realizing of the results of world-wide inhabitants getting older.

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Extra info for Aging in East and West: Families, States, and the Elderly

Example text

The history of modern Western social policy has been very much about provision for the elderly population—that is, for the condition and attendant risks of being old and possibly alone in a wage labor economy. Of all vulnerable groups and conditions to be in, this is the one that has everywhere (in the West) been among the first to be singled out for collective public attention. It is one of the most obvious, the most deserving, the least controversial, and the least likely to be openly resented by other members of society—most of whom now expect to experience old age in their turn.

The history of modern Western social policy has been very much about provision for the elderly population—that is, for the condition and attendant risks of being old and possibly alone in a wage labor economy. Of all vulnerable groups and conditions to be in, this is the one that has everywhere (in the West) been among the first to be singled out for collective public attention. It is one of the most obvious, the most deserving, the least controversial, and the least likely to be openly resented by other members of society—most of whom now expect to experience old age in their turn.

Yet it is now, within the so-called liberal democracies of Western Europe, North America, and Australasia where the elderly population does indeed constitute a potentially powerful voting (not to say policy-making) constituency, that their claims are ostensibly being questioned and contested as never before. In the eyes of the non-Western developed world, there need be no paradox in this. It is commonly assumed that individualistic Westerners do not respect and care for their elderly members in the way that (for instance) families do in Confucianist societies.

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